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What is cutaneous lymphoma?

Cutaneous lymphoma is a rare type of cancer that starts in the skin. It’s not considered skin cancer because it originates in the skin’s white blood cells (lymphocytes). White blood cells help fight off infection and disease in the body. 

Normally, cells in the body will grow and divide to replace old or damaged cells. This growth is usually precise. Once enough cells are produced to replace the old ones, normal cells stop dividing. Cancerous tumors occur when there is an error and cells continue to grow uncontrollably. With cutaneous lymphomas, white blood cells attack the skin. Cutaneous lymphoma can develop from T-cell white blood cells and B-cell white blood cells in the skin.

Cutaneous lymphoma is treatable but known to reoccur. Successful treatment of cutaneous lymphoma depends on age, stage and location of cancer, and other factors.


Skin Care Team

Here at Parkview, you’ll be cared for by a dedicated team of skin cancer specialists and sub-specialists, not a general oncologist who treats all types of cancer.

Learn more about our skin care team.

Research & Clinical Trials

Parkview Research Center, in collaboration with Parkview Cancer Institute, provides innovative clinical research dedicated to advancing cancer care. 

View current research & clinical trials.